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The Girl From Home by Adam Mitzner

The Girl from Home” reads like an episode of “Billions” meets “How to Get Away with Murder” and I loved the ingenious plot combination.

Adam Mitzner is by profession an attorney.  His expertise clearly shines through in the realistic way the dual cases of securities fraud and murder-for-hire are resolved into a satisfying plea bargain for the main characters.

The main protagonist is Jonathan Caine, the head of a currency trading department for a major Wall Street brokerage.  He is the quintissential forty-something narcissistic, ego-involved Wall Street millionaire who’s motto is “I want what I want”– and he usually gets what he wants.  It appears as if he is even going to get a pass on securities fraud when he is finally tripped up by an audit of his fund’s books that shows he has been cooking those books.  In that sense Caine comes off as a mini-Madoff, but one who shows in the end that he has a conscience and feels remorse for what he has done wrong and feels empathy for other people.  We see that empathy grow in the scenes with Jonathan’s dying father and the moving eulogy that he gives at his father’s funeral.  You also see it grow as he develops a protective relationship with a classmate he reengages with at his 25th high school anniversary in East Carlisle, New Jersey.  The woman, Jackie, is in an unhappy, abusive marriage, and Jonathan helps her to get out of that relationship.

The murder mystery portion of “The Girl from Home“commences when Jackie and Jonathan both conclude that Jackie’s husband, Rick, will never let her go alive.  Divorce is not going to work and neither will depending on the police to keep her safe.  What we don’t know for certain is which one of our protagonists actually hires a hit man, if either, and how the police will play Jackie and Jonathan off each other in questioning them about the murder.  There’s a nice twist on the ending that I think most readers will find satisfying.  Justice is served in the end.

Highly recommended.

Reviewed from a supplied copy.

Liz Nichols

 

 

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