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All the Sons of Abraham by Eldred Buck

Eldred Buck, who has experience as an investment banker in London, Saudi Arabia and elsewhere, has written a novel about living as an expatriot in Saudi Arabia called “All the Sons of Abraham.”  Buck clearly has extensive knowledge about international investment banking and understands what it is like to live as a foreign national in Islamic society.  Anyone looking for information on what life would be like working for a Saudi company and living in one of the international neighborhoods outside of Jeddah would do well to read this book.  The book may also be important in documenting some of the lead-up in the 1990’s to the conflicts between Islamic fundamentalists and the economic, cultural and political leadership in the West.

On the other hand, anyone looking for a fast-paced international financial thriller will not find it in “All the Sons of Abraham.”  It is simply not very thrilling.  At 802 pages it is just too long and convoluted to hold attention as a novel.  I slogged through half the book in two weeks and never got anywhere with the plot.  It is not until nearly half-way through the book that the more important elements of the plot are introduced– a financial debacle in the making precipitated by one of the managers of the Saudi bank that employes a unit of western investment bankers at their Jeddah headquarters; the radicalization of one of the sons of one of the Saudi trainees working with the western group of investment bankers; and the conflicts between western social, cultural and economic thought and practice and those of Islamic and Saudi culture.

The book is not well edited.  The first 400 pages should have been reduced to about 100 with tightly written story arcs that keep the reader looking for what happens next page after page.  The elements of intrigue and potential conflict needed to be introduced much earlier with less time spent on the issue of the main character’s mistress and how he could get away from that relationship without letting his wife know about it.  That appears to be a side-issue in the book that is really the only story arc that occupies the first 200 pages or so.  The main characters need to be developed so that the reader grows to care about what happens to at least some of them.  In half the book I still have not run into a character I really like or care about except possibly Omar, the bank financier in training who is increasingly in conflict with the very strict Islamic laws and increasingly under the surveillance of a relative who is a member of the religious police.

With some relief, I finally decided to put down “All the Sons of Abraham” and move on to one of the other many books that awaited me in my “to be read” pile.

Reviewed from a provided copy.

Liz Nichols

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