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Conversation With Eliot Pattison is on for Tonight!

If you’re a fan of international mystery plots like I am you’ll want to make a point of calling in to hear all about Eliot Pattison and his latest book “Mandarin Gate” at 7 p.m. central time.  Call to 1-218-936-4700 and enter code 5819354 when prompted.  This will be a long distance charge call, but if you have Skype you should be able to get on free if you are in the U.S.  The conversation should last about 90 minutes.

Here’s a little about Eliot Pattison from his publicist, Julia Drake:  “Described as “a writer of faraway mysteries,” Eliot Pattison’s travel and interests span a million miles of global trekking, visiting every continent but Antarctica. An international lawyer by training, he brings his social and cultural concerns to his fiction and has also written several books and dozens of articles on legal and business topics, published on three continents. He is the author of the Edgar award-winning Inspector Shan Series, the Bone Rattler series, and Ashes of the Earth, the first novel in a new dystopian series. But his sentiments for Tibet and the Tibetan resistance run deep. His Inspector Shan books have been characterized as a new “campaign thriller” genre for the way they weave significant social and political themes into their plots. Translated into twenty languages, the books have been adapted to radio dramas and become popular on the black market in China. For more info visit: www.eliotpattison.com

Even if you are not a mystery reader generally, this novel is where fiction meets fact in the area of human rights and the absorption of Tibet by its Chinese overlords.  Those concerned with the treatment of the Tibetan people under Chinese control will want to hear Mr. Pattison’s ideas, experiences and research on this topic.

You can participate by adding your questions to the comment area on this blog.  I will be monitoring the blog this evening and will pick up as many questions as possible for Mr. Pattison to address.  Depending on the number of people on the call (we have 150 lines available) we may try to unmute near the end at least for a few minutes.

One of the reasons I am so interested in Pattison’s Inspector Shan series and in the way he brings to the western world a greater understanding of what is happening within Tibet is that in 2005 I had the privilege to attend an audience with the Dalai Lama.  The powerful presence of this holy leader and the message that he brought of peace and understanding despite the terrible things happening within his own country was astonishing.  I will never forget this experience!

Liz Nichols

 

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Review of The Lord of Death by Eliot Pattison

“The Lord of Death” is the 6th in Eliot Pattison’s Shan mystery series.  He is the Edgar Award-winner for his first Shan novel, “The Skull Mantra.”

Shan Yao Tun is an undocumented Chinese exile in Tibet living under a brutal Chinese regime.  He has made his living helping with foreign mountain climbing expeditions on Everest and other Tibetan peaks, and yet at any time he can be arrested for being an undocumented alien.

The main mission in this book is to get Shan’s son, Ko, transferred out of the ‘yeti factory,” a hospital prison where the Chinese perform medical and biological experiments on live human subjects, and to get him back into a “normal” prison gulag environment.

Shan also solves a number of mysteries along the way in “The Lord of Death” including solving the deaths of a famous Nepalese climber, a Chinese bureaucrat and a pretty female American climber.

He must also try to save a band of monks who have been rousted from their “gompa” or remote monastery hide-out.  To help the monks escape to Nepal or India Shan had to get the help of an American mountain climbing organizer, some Chinese officals, and even a Tibetan police officer. The trade-offs he had to make with the Chinese officials, especially in order to get his son released from the “yeti factory,” makes for particularly interesting insights into how business is done in occupied Tibet.

Pattison obviously is an excellent scholar of Chinese and Tibetan philosophy and culture, and of Buddhism. He makes it al make sense to the western outsider.

Pattison’s writing is fresh and exciting.  He really makes the reader feel a part of the culture and to emphathize with the people who are trying to survive in a brutal environment and under an intolerant regime.

I want to go back and read others in this series and look forward to reading the next in the saga of Shan and his Tibetan experiences.

Liz Nichols

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