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Jane and the Twelve Days of Christmas by Stephanie Barron

Barron’s “Jane and the Twelve Days of Christmas” is fittingly the twelfth novel in the “Being a Jane Austen Mystery” series.  Barron continues to write in the style of Jane Austen and uses the nineteenth century writer as a fictional character in the crime-solving series.

Jane and her family are invited to spend the holidays at The Vyne, a large manorhouse several miles from the parsonage at Steventon where Jane’s brother, James is vicar.  The invitation comes after Jane, her sister and mother are run off the road by a carriage with a mysterious gentleman who is headed to The Vyne rather as an apology.  At The Vyne they meet the Gambier’s the wife and young adult son and daughter of an Admiral, Mr. West, the son of a famous painter, and Thomas Vere-Chute, the brother of William Chute, the lord of the manor.   There are also assorted staff at the manor, including Benedict L’Anglois, secretary to Mr. Chute.  A messenger arrives from Admiral Gambier with the original of the Treaty of Ghent that signaled the truce between Great Britain and the United States in the War of 1812.  The charter required Chute’s review and signature as a Member of Parliament.  The young officer is killed before he even gets off The Vyne property the day after her arrived on his way back to London.  Jane finds a thin wire that was used to bring down the officer’s horse and several other clues also point to murder.  There is a second murder a couple days later.  Were the crimes committed by the same hand?

The solution to the murders is absorbing even though there are relatively few potential suspects and relatively little character development to help point toward one or more culprit.  The book also serves as a good reminder of how easy life is for most of us now compared to days before modern utilities and transportation.  A 15 mile trip in winter could easily take a couple days in a conveyance which might only have a few hot bricks to keep the feet warm.  Yet families braved the elements to celebrate the holidays with family and friends just as they do now.

Lovers of this series will enjoy “Jane and the Twelve Days of Christmas.” It is certainly appropriate to curl up with this book on a cold winter’s night in front of a roaring fire.

Liz Nichols

 

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